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Creating a Circle of Support

No one can go it alone. Whether you have diabetes or you’re a caregiver, it’s important to have a few options for emotional support. Knowing who to turn to with specific questions will make life easier. Find other people with diabetes  Few things are more comforting than talking with someone who understands you when you have diabetes, or if you are facing a type 1 or type 2 diagnosis. If you don’t already have a friend or family member with diabetes who can fill this role, seek out a diabetes support group near you. What have you got to lose? If you don’t like one group, look for...

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Preparing for Pregnancy

Preparing for pregnancy—good reasons to start today Let's think into the future. Imagine sitting in a rocking chair playing with ten brand-new, tiny toes. That's the image you can remember every time you check your blood glucose, visit your doctor or say no to a glass of wine. And it's absolutely worth it. Not ready for parenthood yet? Here's what you can do now. There are several things you can do to prepare for pregnancy well before you're ready to conceive. Read about it—just not too much. When you understand the risks, you...

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How to Talk to Your Doctor

How to Talk to Your Doctor Whether you’ve been living with diabetes for years or you’re newly diagnosed, communicating with your healthcare team is one of the best things you can do. If you’re nervous about opening up to your doctor or pharmacist, there are some good reasons to conquer these fears. Less communication leads to measurable increases in your stress, anxiety, and possible depression. It also leads, inevitably, to less frequent and less successful diabetes management.1 Since communicating with your healthcare providers is proven to be good for your health, here are some guidelines for starting...

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Treating Low BG

Low blood glucose: Know the signs and steps to take You may recognize the feeling—feeling hungry, dizzy, sweaty or just a little bit "off." These signs of hypoglycaemia, or low blood glucose, mean it's time to take action. What causes low blood glucose? For most people, low blood glucose refers to anything below 4.0 mmol/L , although your number may be different.1 Low blood glucose can be caused by taking too much medication, not having enough to eat or exercising. In fact, hypoglycaemia can occur up to 12 hours after you've been...

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What is A1C?

Your A1C number Consider your A1C number (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) as a snapshot of your blood glucose levels over several months. Over time, glucose naturally attaches itself to your blood cells. When this happens, the cell is considered “glycated.” The more glucose in your blood, the more glycated A1C cells you have. What’s an optimal A1C number? The recommended A1C target for a person with diabetes is 7% or lower—some people remember this figure as “lucky number 7.” However, while your A1C number gives you and your doctor an idea of how your diabetes is being managed over time, it...

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Tips for Making Testing Easier

Whether you check your blood glucose level once a week, once a day, or 6 times a day, learning how to make testing easy and less painful may inspire you to test more often. For people with diabetes, the knowledge that you gain from testing is the key to staying in control of your health. It helps you make informed decisions about medicine, food, and exercise. It helps you cope with the day-to-day demands of living with diabetes, you’ll feel better each day, and you’ll lower your risk for future diabetes complications.1 Here are some tips for getting the best results possible. A guide: when to test...

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Eating Healthy with Diabetes

You don’t have to sacrifice your target blood sugar levels to enjoy some of your favorite foods. Here’s how to eat healthy with #diabetes, whether you’re cooking at home, or eating in a restaurant. Carbohydrates and your blood sugar Carbohydrates are sugars. They break down in the body creating glucose, a main source of energy. Counting the carbs you eat at every meal and pairing them with the correct dosage of insulin can keep your blood sugar level closer to normal range.1 It also allows you to eat a wider variety of foods. In fact, your diet can accommodate any food in...

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Insulin Injections: Breaking Down The Barrier

If insulin injections are part of your daily life, you know how essential they are to managing your diabetes and preventing complications. You also know that following your injection schedule is crucial. If your body doesn’t get enough insulin over the long term, you risk developing serious problems with your eyes, heart, nerves and kidneys. Getting too much insulin could lead to hypoglycemia—extreme cases of which can cause diabetic coma. Despite all this, according to a study conducted in the US, over half of people with insulin-dependent diabetes have deliberately skipped injections at some point. Around 20% do it...

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